Yale School of Medicine is leading a new study, Open-label Trial of Tofacitinib in Cutaneous Sarcoidosis and Granuloma Annulare. The purpose of this research study is to analyze the treatment potential of tofacitinib in patients with sarcoidosis that involves the skin. Tofacitinib is a medication that may inhibit certain factors that cause the signs and symptoms of sarcoidosis.

If eligible, participants will receive tofacitinib twice daily for 6 months with response to therapy assessments at the 1, 3, and 6 month intervals.  Upon completion of the first 6 months, participants will have the option to continue treatment for an additional 6 months.

Participation requires 4-6 office visits to Yale in New Haven, Ct.  An additional 2-3 visits will be required for the optional 6-month continuation.

Compensation for this study will include $50 per visit. Evaluation of responses of internal organ involvement of sarcoidosis to treatment will be optional and involve two CAT scans; participants opting to participate in this portion of the study will receive an additional $300 in compensation.

Inclusion Criteria

  • 18 years or older
  • Diagnosis of cutaneous sarcoidosis
  • If participant is on other systemic therapies for their sarcoidosis, they must be taking a stable dose of the other medication(s) for at least 3 months with no plans to change the regimen in the next 6 months. Exception of methotrexate and/or low dose prednisone.
  • Willingness to undergo skin biopsies, blood draw, and total body photography
  • Compliance with clinic visits

Exclusion Criteria

  • History of malignancy (except history of successfully treated basal cell or squamous cell carcinoma of the skin)
  • Tuberculosis – Active or latent
  • Significant hepatic impairment or history of untreated hepatitis virus infection
  • Untreated peptic ulcer disease
  • Use of certain immunosuppressants, e.g. infliximab, azathioprine, etc.
  • Women of childbearing potential who are unwilling or unable to use birth control while taking this medication

If you are interested in this study and would like more information, please contact Dr. William Damsky at william.damsky@yale.edu.

Learn more about this study here!